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Tanzania Cultural Tour

Experience the charm of the friendly Tanzanian people first-hand. It is a rewarding experience to leave your 4X4 vehicle behind and walk through scenic local resident villages with greatest Cultural landscapes in Africa. There are several cultural heritage sites scattered throughout the country where you can spend from ½ day to a week with one of the 120 distinct ethnic groups making up the population. At the sites you will encounter natural beauty, including: rain forests, big waterfalls, magnificent views, lots of wild life, and, of course, the charming Tanzanians themselves. Your cultural tour will directly support the villages’ desire to become more self-sufficient, preserve their indigenous culture, and aid environmental conservation efforts.

Cultural Tourism Program Sites include:

Babati and Hanang, Engaruka, Ilkiding’a, Gezaulole, Kisangara, Longido, Machame, Mamba and Marangu, Mbeya, Mkuru, Mto wa Mbu, Mulala, Ng’Iresi, Northern Pare Mts, Pangani, Southern Pare Mts, Western Usambara.

Hadzabe Cultural Tour

Take a journey into the “Gods must be crazy” movie. The Hadzabe tribe of Tanzania is the last true nomades of Africa. We can take you on an amazing adventure with the Hadzas. You will join the men as they hunt for their daily subsidance using traditional Bow and arrows, or join the women as they forrage for fruits and berries. This is not a show or a “tourist put on”. This is the real deal. A true African cultural experience, not for the faint of heart.

The Hadza, or Hadzabe, an indigenous ethnic group in north-central Tanzania, living around Lake Eyasi in the central Rift Valley and in the neighboring Serengeti Plateau.

The Hadza are not closely related to any other people. While traditionally classified with the Khoisan languages, primarily because it has clicks, the Hadza language appears to be an isolate, unrelated to any other.

Masai Cultural Tour

The Maasai are an indigenous African ethnic group of semi-nomadic people located in northern Tanzania. Due to their distinctive customs and dress and residence near the many game parks of East Africa, they are among the most well-known African ethnic groups internationally. They speak Maa, a member of the Nilo-Saharan language family that is related to Dinka and Nuer.

The most famous of Africa’s people, these fierce warriors are still practicing their ancestral way of life and are known for their pastoral traditions, living off their herds of cattle, sheep, goats, and donkeys. Since time immemorial the Maasai moved nomadically in search of water and pasture for their herds. Today they have established permanent settlements, and many of the Maasai do not roam. They still exist on a diet of milk, blood, and meat, however, it is becoming very common place to supplement their diet with grain. The few Maasai left today still coexist collectively with the profuse wildlife.

At the Maasai village, you will have the opportunity to meet with a Maasai family, visit a traditional boma, the village huts (called Manyatta), made of cow dung and clay plastered over stick frames, and perhaps venture to a local school or clinic. If you would like to extend your half-day adventure, and turn it into a full-day’s exploration, you can experience a day in the life of a young Maasai or, for an authentic interaction, watch a bloodletting ceremony. It is an extraordinary reality how the Maasai people live in the heart of the bush, with warthogs foraging and elephants trumpeting just on their periphery.

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